EXPLORE THE ROOTS OF JAPANESE DESIGN

tokyo

  • Learn about the folk crafts movement and its minimalist aesthetic
  • Discover a selection of Japan’s pottery, textiles, paintings and more
  • Unearth a host of design in a perfectly preserved traditional wooden house




Admirers of Japan’s minimalist aesthetic should make a pilgrimage to the Komaba neighborhood where, at the end of a quiet residential street, about a seven-minute walk from the west gate of the Komaba-Todaimae station, sits a perfectly preserved wooden house: the Japan Folk Crafts Museum. Also known as the Mingeikan, it was set up in the 1930s by the founder of Japan’s folk crafts movement, Soetsu Yanagi (incidentally the father of one of Japan’s most iconic contemporary designers, Sori Yanagi). Today, it’s worth a visit for the atmospheric wooden building alone. Slip off your shoes at the genkan entrance. Inside, you’ll be rewarded with a crisply curated selection of Japan’s finest folk crafts—from simple pottery and textiles to paintings and tea-ceremony tools. The small gift shop selling Japanese craft and design products is also a real gem.













Located in the Komaba area, the Mingeikan can be found near the University of Tokyo. The wooden facade is easy to recognize in the leafy streets, with two wide brown doors marking the way. A large black stone lies in the garden opposite the main entrance.

JAPAN FOLK CRAFTS MUSEUM (MINGEIKAN): 4-3-33 Komaba, Meguro-ku; +81-(0)3-3467-4527; mingeikan.or.jp​​​





EXPLORE THE ROOTS OF JAPANESE DESIGN

EXPLORE THE ROOTS OF JAPANESE DESIGN

tokyo

  • Learn about the folk crafts movement and its minimalist aesthetic
  • Discover a selection of Japan’s pottery, textiles, paintings and more
  • Unearth a host of design in a perfectly preserved traditional wooden house




Admirers of Japan’s minimalist aesthetic should make a pilgrimage to the Komaba neighborhood where, at the end of a quiet residential street, about a seven-minute walk from the west gate of the Komaba-Todaimae station, sits a perfectly preserved wooden house: the Japan Folk Crafts Museum. Also known as the Mingeikan, it was set up in the 1930s by the founder of Japan’s folk crafts movement, Soetsu Yanagi (incidentally the father of one of Japan’s most iconic contemporary designers, Sori Yanagi). Today, it’s worth a visit for the atmospheric wooden building alone. Slip off your shoes at the genkan entrance. Inside, you’ll be rewarded with a crisply curated selection of Japan’s finest folk crafts—from simple pottery and textiles to paintings and tea-ceremony tools. The small gift shop selling Japanese craft and design products is also a real gem.













Located in the Komaba area, the Mingeikan can be found near the University of Tokyo. The wooden facade is easy to recognize in the leafy streets, with two wide brown doors marking the way. A large black stone lies in the garden opposite the main entrance.

JAPAN FOLK CRAFTS MUSEUM (MINGEIKAN): 4-3-33 Komaba, Meguro-ku; +81-(0)3-3467-4527; mingeikan.or.jp​​​