VISIT A YOUNG MASTER

tokyo

  • Taste impeccable morsels from Japan’s next great sushi chefs
  • Experience the country’s national dish like you’ve never seen it before
  • Try a chef’s speciality, tuna soup made by simmering a very flavorsome cut




Sure, Jiro has become a household name, but we’re more interested in discovering Japan’s next great sushi chefs. Two you shouldn’t miss on your visit are Sushi Iwa and Sushi Tokami, both on the same sushi-centered street in Ginza. Hisayoshi Iwa presides solo over the six-seat counter at Sushi Iwa at both lunch and dinner (lunch is a fantastic value at only 5,000 yen) where he delivers impeccable traditional Edo-style sushi. Each piece of nigiri—be it golden sea bream, horse mackerel, amberjack, or sea urchin—is dressed by the chef (He’ll also hand English speakers a sushi reference manual so they can follow along.) At Sushi Tokami, Hiroyuki Sato, who grew up in a family of restaurateurs, takes a more playful approach. First off, you’ll notice his sushi rice is darker; that’s because, unlike other chefs, he seasons it with red vinegar. Highlights in the omakase meal revolve around some of the best tuna in Tokyo (he uses the number-one tuna wholesaler at Tsukiji), including his tossaki hand roll, made from an extremely rare and creamy part of the tuna neck; his chutoro nigiri; and his collagen-rich tuna soup that signals that the two-and-a-half-hour meal is coming to a close.













Ideal for those looking for a stunning traditional meal without going too far, Sushi Iwa is just a 15 minute walk from the Conrad Hilton. Take the crosswalk over Daiichi-Keihin into the Ginza district and you’ll soon be on your way. Likewise, Sushi Tokami can also be found nearby in Ginza.

SUSHI IWA: 8-5-25 Ginza; +81-(0)3-3572-0955

SUSHI TOKAMI: Ginza Seiwa Silver Building, 8-2-10 Ginza; +81-(0)3-3571-6005; sushitokami.3zoku.com





VISIT A YOUNG MASTER

VISIT A YOUNG MASTER

tokyo

  • Taste impeccable morsels from Japan’s next great sushi chefs
  • Experience the country’s national dish like you’ve never seen it before
  • Try a chef’s speciality, tuna soup made by simmering a very flavorsome cut




Sure, Jiro has become a household name, but we’re more interested in discovering Japan’s next great sushi chefs. Two you shouldn’t miss on your visit are Sushi Iwa and Sushi Tokami, both on the same sushi-centered street in Ginza. Hisayoshi Iwa presides solo over the six-seat counter at Sushi Iwa at both lunch and dinner (lunch is a fantastic value at only 5,000 yen) where he delivers impeccable traditional Edo-style sushi. Each piece of nigiri—be it golden sea bream, horse mackerel, amberjack, or sea urchin—is dressed by the chef (He’ll also hand English speakers a sushi reference manual so they can follow along.) At Sushi Tokami, Hiroyuki Sato, who grew up in a family of restaurateurs, takes a more playful approach. First off, you’ll notice his sushi rice is darker; that’s because, unlike other chefs, he seasons it with red vinegar. Highlights in the omakase meal revolve around some of the best tuna in Tokyo (he uses the number-one tuna wholesaler at Tsukiji), including his tossaki hand roll, made from an extremely rare and creamy part of the tuna neck; his chutoro nigiri; and his collagen-rich tuna soup that signals that the two-and-a-half-hour meal is coming to a close.













Ideal for those looking for a stunning traditional meal without going too far, Sushi Iwa is just a 15 minute walk from the Conrad Hilton. Take the crosswalk over Daiichi-Keihin into the Ginza district and you’ll soon be on your way. Likewise, Sushi Tokami can also be found nearby in Ginza.

SUSHI IWA: 8-5-25 Ginza; +81-(0)3-3572-0955

SUSHI TOKAMI: Ginza Seiwa Silver Building, 8-2-10 Ginza; +81-(0)3-3571-6005; sushitokami.3zoku.com