HEAD TO THE BEACH...AND AN ONSEN, TOO

tokyo

  • Fill up on sea air at a sublime coastal town surrounded by dense forests
  • See one of Japan’s most iconic Great Buddha statues
  • Soak your worries away in a traditional Onsen - an outdoor hot-spring bath




For a restorative blast of fresh sea air, leave the skyscrapers behind and jump on a train to Kamakura (only one hour away). The pretty coastal town, surrounded by dense, green, temple-filled mountains, is a mecca for surf lovers, writers, and creatives (novelist Haruki Murakami has a home here). Either walk or rent an old bicycle from the train station (turn right out of the main exit to find a bike-rental outlet) and stop first at the nearby green market. Here, pick up some delicious fresh bread from Paradise Alley to eat later on the beach before peeking inside the boutiques selling everything from herbs to clothing. Next, follow the narrow streets to one of Kamakura’s most famous sites: the vast Great Buddha statue at Kotokuin Temple. Hungry? Head to Matsubara-an, in a serene traditional Japanese house. Nab a seat in the garden (if weather permits) and order a bowl of their handmade soba noodles. The beach is, of course, the heart of Kamakura, lined with temporary bars in the summer months, emptier but no less enticing the rest of the year—and pretty much always perfect for watching the local surfers tackle the (admittedly small) waves with enthusiasm. On clear days, you can make out the distinct silhouette of Mount Fuji in the distance. If you’re feeling chilly, head to Inamuragasaki Onsen, home to traditional mineral-rich indoor and outdoor hot-spring baths. Finally, for some afternoon tea and organic macrobiotic scones (tastier than they sound), swing by Sorafune, a vegan restaurant set in yet another charming wooden kominka house.













Kamakura and the Kotokuin Temple are easily accessed by train from the Conrad Tokyo. It’s a few minutes walk to Shimbashi Station where you can get the Yokosuka Line to Kamakura Station and change for Kotokuin. Alternatively, make the last part of your journey by foot, cutting under the quiet mountainous passes of Kamakura.​

​​PARADISE ALLEY: 1-13-10 Komachi, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)90-8053-9322; paradisealley.jp

​​KOTOKUIN TEMPLE: 4-2-28 Hase, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-22-0703; kotoku-in.jp

​​MATSUBARA-AN: 4-10-3 Yuigahama, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-61-3838; matsubara-an.com

​​INAMURAGASAKI ONSEN: 1-16-3 Ogigayatsu, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-22-7199; inamuragasaki-onsen.com

​​SORAFUNE: 2-2-2 Omachi, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-38-4085; facebook.com/sorafune​​












HEAD TO THE BEACH...AND AN ONSEN, TOO

HEAD TO THE BEACH...AND AN ONSEN, TOO

tokyo

  • Fill up on sea air at a sublime coastal town surrounded by dense forests
  • See one of Japan’s most iconic Great Buddha statues
  • Soak your worries away in a traditional Onsen - an outdoor hot-spring bath




For a restorative blast of fresh sea air, leave the skyscrapers behind and jump on a train to Kamakura (only one hour away). The pretty coastal town, surrounded by dense, green, temple-filled mountains, is a mecca for surf lovers, writers, and creatives (novelist Haruki Murakami has a home here). Either walk or rent an old bicycle from the train station (turn right out of the main exit to find a bike-rental outlet) and stop first at the nearby green market. Here, pick up some delicious fresh bread from Paradise Alley to eat later on the beach before peeking inside the boutiques selling everything from herbs to clothing. Next, follow the narrow streets to one of Kamakura’s most famous sites: the vast Great Buddha statue at Kotokuin Temple. Hungry? Head to Matsubara-an, in a serene traditional Japanese house. Nab a seat in the garden (if weather permits) and order a bowl of their handmade soba noodles. The beach is, of course, the heart of Kamakura, lined with temporary bars in the summer months, emptier but no less enticing the rest of the year—and pretty much always perfect for watching the local surfers tackle the (admittedly small) waves with enthusiasm. On clear days, you can make out the distinct silhouette of Mount Fuji in the distance. If you’re feeling chilly, head to Inamuragasaki Onsen, home to traditional mineral-rich indoor and outdoor hot-spring baths. Finally, for some afternoon tea and organic macrobiotic scones (tastier than they sound), swing by Sorafune, a vegan restaurant set in yet another charming wooden kominka house.













Kamakura and the Kotokuin Temple are easily accessed by train from the Conrad Tokyo. It’s a few minutes walk to Shimbashi Station where you can get the Yokosuka Line to Kamakura Station and change for Kotokuin. Alternatively, make the last part of your journey by foot, cutting under the quiet mountainous passes of Kamakura.​

​​PARADISE ALLEY: 1-13-10 Komachi, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)90-8053-9322; paradisealley.jp

​​KOTOKUIN TEMPLE: 4-2-28 Hase, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-22-0703; kotoku-in.jp

​​MATSUBARA-AN: 4-10-3 Yuigahama, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-61-3838; matsubara-an.com

​​INAMURAGASAKI ONSEN: 1-16-3 Ogigayatsu, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-22-7199; inamuragasaki-onsen.com

​​SORAFUNE: 2-2-2 Omachi, Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture; +81-(0)467-38-4085; facebook.com/sorafune​​