Step Back in Time for Coffee

tokyo

● Head off the beaten track to discover a legendary coffee house
● Sample brews made from aged beans dating back to the 1950s
● Taste the most acclaimed iced coffee in Tokyo





Tokyo is flooded with upstart coffee bars these days, where hipster baristas with impressive skills and unerringly cool haircuts cater to a youthful clientele. But Café de l’Ambre is on a whole other level, thanks to its centenarian owner Ichiro Sekiguchi, who opened the place in 1948 and still shows up most days to tend the shop. (Many of Ichiro-san’s regulars aren’t much younger than him.) What this tiny Ginza coffee house lacks in space—there are only a few tables and some well-worn stools at the counter—it makes up for in nostalgic character, looking like it’s been preserved in amber since the ‘40s; the retro signage alone is worthy of a design museum. But it’s the coffee itself that draws the faithful. Besides its excellent pour-over, Café de l’Ambre is known for two things: its impressive collection of aged coffee beans (including a rare Colombian vintage from 1954), which are all available for purchase, and its superb iced coffee, chilled in a shaker and artfully poured into an elegant
cocktail coupe.














Café de l’Ambre is a 12-minute walk from Conrad Tokyo, around
the corner from the Don Quijote store in Ginza (see “Visit Only-in-Tokyo Shops” itinerary).

Café de l’Ambre: 8 Chome-10-15 Ginza; +81-(0)3-3571-1551; h6.dion.ne.jp/~lambre












Step Back in Time for Coffee

Step Back in Time for Coffee

tokyo

● Head off the beaten track to discover a legendary coffee house
● Sample brews made from aged beans dating back to the 1950s
● Taste the most acclaimed iced coffee in Tokyo





Tokyo is flooded with upstart coffee bars these days, where hipster baristas with impressive skills and unerringly cool haircuts cater to a youthful clientele. But Café de l’Ambre is on a whole other level, thanks to its centenarian owner Ichiro Sekiguchi, who opened the place in 1948 and still shows up most days to tend the shop. (Many of Ichiro-san’s regulars aren’t much younger than him.) What this tiny Ginza coffee house lacks in space—there are only a few tables and some well-worn stools at the counter—it makes up for in nostalgic character, looking like it’s been preserved in amber since the ‘40s; the retro signage alone is worthy of a design museum. But it’s the coffee itself that draws the faithful. Besides its excellent pour-over, Café de l’Ambre is known for two things: its impressive collection of aged coffee beans (including a rare Colombian vintage from 1954), which are all available for purchase, and its superb iced coffee, chilled in a shaker and artfully poured into an elegant
cocktail coupe.














Café de l’Ambre is a 12-minute walk from Conrad Tokyo, around
the corner from the Don Quijote store in Ginza (see “Visit Only-in-Tokyo Shops” itinerary).

Café de l’Ambre: 8 Chome-10-15 Ginza; +81-(0)3-3571-1551; h6.dion.ne.jp/~lambre